Acid Reflux & Gastritis

A description of your symptoms and knowledge of your medical history is usually enough for your doctor to diagnose a reflux problem. Acid reflux is when stomach acid or bile flows back up into the esophagus, which can irritate the esophageal lining. Signs and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, include both acid reflux and heartburn and may also include chest pain and difficulty swallowing. Gastritis involves a group of conditions that cause inflammation of the stomach lining. Symptoms of gastritis are similar to the symptoms of GERD in which there is a burning pain or indigestion. Additional signs and symptoms of gastritis may also include nausea, vomiting, belching and loss of appetite.

Gastritis can have many causes, and if a patient presents with the symptoms of stomach lining inflammation, the doctor might request some tests to learn more about the situation. In the case of reflux gastritis, patients might notice symptoms such as cramps , nausea, vomiting and poor digestion. Some foods might trigger acute episodes of stomach pain, and basic control measures such as altering the diet might not resolve the problem. The doctor can use a gastroscopy procedure to look inside the stomach, evaluate the valve at the base and take samples from any lesions in the stomach so that they can be inspected by a pathologist.

A major cause of both acute and chronic gastritis is infection of the stomach mucosa by a bacterial species named Helicobacter pylori. Usually, this bacterium first infects the stomach antrum (stomach mucosa without acid-producing cells) acutely and may progress to infect most or all of the stomach’s mucosa over time (chronic navigate to this website gastritis) and remain there for years. This infection generates an initial strong inflammatory response and eventually, a long-term chronic inflammation with intestinal cell changes may develop. Another major cause of acute and chronic gastritis is the use (and overuse) of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Foods that irritate the stomach will cause inflammation, which will trigger acid production or reflux. Limit any food that could cause heartburn. Avoid greasy, fried foods and foods that are very spicy, as well as alcohol. Stay away from gas-producing edibles such as cooked dried beans, broccoli, cabbage, onions, whole milk and some fruits. Too much gas in the stomach will cause pressure and bloating. Other things that may aggravate your symptoms are orange juice, lemons, lemonade, grapefruit juice, cranberry juice, tomatoes, coffee, tea and other caffeinated or carbonated drinks.

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