Are Coffee And Tea Off Limits?

Not being willing to give up Earl Grey, I decided to switch to Twinings Earl Grey Green tea. With this simple change my reflux problems disappeared completely. I could now drink tea by the pot full once again. If your tea addiction is causing you pain, try making the green tea switch. It is of interest to note green tea is often cited as being lower in caffeine than black tea. Some scientists researched the claims and it turns out not to true. If your reflux is sensitive to caffeine changing to green tea may not help.

When it comes to dietary intake and acid reflux symptoms, people tend to be highly individual in terms of what helps and what hinders. There is increasing scientific interest in herbal medicine; however, the lack of standardization of herbal ingredients limits the conclusions that can be drawn about particular preparations. Many herbs have always been valued for their more medicinal properties. On the other hand, many herbs are unknown quantities to modern science, having potential for drug interactions and other untoward effects. Herbal tea is not a magic cure for acid reflux, but swapping out the coffee or caffeinated beverages for a soothing herbal tea is something you can try easily, and it may even help ease your symptoms.

Doctors recommend that switching from regular black tea (which may contain caffeine) to herbal teas can bring about relief from acid reflux symptoms. Chamomile tea is a natural remedy for a plethora of gastrointestinal disorders, according to studies. According to an Egyptian study conducted in 2015, an herbal concoction made with chamomile flower, bitter candy tuft, lemon balm leaf, caraway fruit, peppermint leaf, Angelica root, milk thistle fruit, licorice root and greater celandine herb can prevent gastric ulcers. Ginger tea and licorice tea are other excellent digestive aids.

Perhaps one of the best-known natural remedies for digestive trouble, chamomile has a centuries-old history as a versatile medicinal herb. A member of the daisy family, it has also been used for a variety of gastrointestinal conditions and is thought to be effective for calming the stomach, dispelling gas and soothing other conditions likely to accompany acid reflux. There are preliminary indications that chamomile could have antiinflammatory properties similar to certain nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. That, combined with its long-trusted use in easing indigestion, makes it a good bet for acid reflux. A small percentage of people may have allergic reactions to chamomile.

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