GERD Diet

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a digestive disorder that causes stomach acid to flow back up into the esophagus. Drink a small glass of water at the end of meals to help dilute and wash down any stomach acid that might be splashing up into the esophagus, suggests Shekhar Challa, MD, president of Kansas Medical Clinic and author of Spurn The Burn: Treat The Heat. RefluxMD’s vision is to help adults with acid reflux disease to live healthier and happier lives. We do this by providing high quality disease, treatment, and weight loss information on our website and in our books, and we connect those suffering from this chronic condition with GERD experts for diagnosis and treatment.

You could do worse than to eat a salad every day. Salad is a primary meal for acid refluxers, although tomatoes and onions should be avoided, as well as cheese and high-fat dressings. Keeping a food diary can help you isolate which foods aggravate reflux symptoms and which ones don’t. Vegetables are naturally low for beginners in fat and sugar, and they help reduce stomach acid. Good options include green beans, broccoli, asparagus, cauliflower, leafy greens, potatoes, and cucumbers. Cold brew coffee has a lower amount of caffeine and may be less acidic, which might make it a more acceptable choice for those with GERD or heartburn.

Meals that are low in fat and acid, but high in whole grains, vegetables, and certain fruits can help you avoid heartburn. You might try limiting your consumption of both coffee and tea if you suffer from GERD and see if your symptoms improve. Both can relax the LES. But not every food and beverage affects individuals in the same way. You’ve heard about the foods that can make your heartburn worse, from coffee to chocolate to tomatoes. But what about foods that could make your heartburn better? Check out some key eats you should add to your diet.

In fact, the current guidelines from the American College of Gastroenterology (specialists in the digestive tract) no longer recommend routine dietary changes for the treatment of reflux and GERD. Fennel (pH 6.9) is a great food for acid reflux and actually seems to improve stomach function. Avoid lying down for two to three hours after eating. When you lie down, it’s physically easier for stomach contents to splash up toward the LES. By sitting up or standing, gravity helps stomach contents stay where they belong – at the bottom of the stomach.

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