Reflux In Babies

Babies often bring up milk during or shortly after feeding – this is known as possetting or reflux. Disclaimer: The information available on this website should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care for the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of your child’s reflux. Please consult with your child’s doctor or pharmacist before trying any medication (prescription or OTC) or following any treatment plan mentioned. This information is provided only to help you be as informed as possible about your child’s condition. Hiatal hernias are very common, especially in people over the age of 50, but they are rare in infants. However, the causes are unknown. A hiatal hernia in children is usually congenital (present at birth) and may cause gastric acid to reflux from the stomach into the esophagus.

Like any operation, there are some risks to this surgery. Talk about them with your child’s doctor. She can help you decide if it’s the right treatment for your child. For example, your doctor might recommend surgery if lifestyle changes and medications alone haven’t stopped your symptoms. They might also suggest surgery if you’ve developed complications of GERD. Spitting up, sometimes called physiological or uncomplicated reflux, is common in babies and is usually (but not always) normal. Most young babies spit up sometimes, since their digestive systems are immature, making it easier for the stomach contents to flow back up into the esophagus (the tube connecting mouth to stomach).

Breastmilk oversupply or forceful let-down (milk ejection reflex) can cause reflux-like symptoms, and usually can be remedied with simple measures. Gravity helps keep the contents of the stomach down. It’s best to keep your infant in an upright position for at least 30 minutes after feeding them to prevent food look at more info or milk from coming back up. For the most part, antacids and gas-fighting drugs are safe. At high doses, antacids can cause some side effects, such as diarrhea. If your child takes high doses of them for a long time, he might have a higher risk of thinning bones, called rickets, or vitamin B12 deficiency.

Breastfeed! Reflux is less common in breastfed babies. In addition, breastfed babies with reflux have been shown to have shorter and fewer reflux episodes and less severe reflux at night than formula-fed babies Heacock 1992. Breastfeeding is also best for babies with reflux because breastmilk leaves the stomach much faster Ewer 1994 (so there’s less time for it to back up into the esophagus) and is probably less irritating when it does come back up. It’s rare for infants to have severe symptoms of acid reflux. However, you should call your doctor immediately if your child is experiencing any of these symptoms. They may indicate a serious condition that needs to be treated right away.

He might also prescribe a medicine to help your child’s stomach make less acid. But researchers aren’t sure whether these drugs ease reflux in infants. Most people who have the Nissen fundoplication surgery report very few complications and an improvement in their GERD symptoms. However, you should call your doctor right away if you develop any new symptoms. Your doctor may recommend a change in formula if your baby has severe acid reflux. Most infant formulas are made from cow’s milk and fortified with iron. Some infants are allergic to a protein found in cow’s milk, which can trigger their acid reflux. This makes it necessary to find another type of formula for your baby.

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