Spitting Up & Reflux In The Breastfed Baby

Babies often bring up milk during or shortly after feeding – this is known as possetting or reflux. Certain factors also may contribute to GERD, including obesity , overeating, eating spicy or fried foods, drinking caffeine , carbonation, and specific medications There also appears to be an inherited component to GERD, as it is more common in some families than in others. It’s normal for babies to spit the full report up food and vomit sometimes. But if your baby is spitting up food or vomiting frequently, they might have GERD. Certain foods may be causing acid reflux, depending on your infant’s age. For example, citrus fruits and tomato products increase acid production in the stomach. Foods like chocolate, peppermint, and high-fat foods can keep the LES open longer, causing the contents of the stomach to reflux.

Speak to your baby’s pediatrician if you’re interested in using natural remedies to treat your child’s reflux. You will want to make sure you are choosing both safe and proven remedies. Although seldom seen in breastfed babies, regular projectile vomiting in a newborn can be a sign of pyloric stenosis , a stomach problem requiring surgery. It occurs 4 times more often in boys than in girls, and symptoms usually appear between 3 and 5 weeks of age. Newborns who projectile vomit at least once a day should be checked out by their doctor.

Upper GI endoscopy. This is done using an endoscope (a thin, flexible, lighted tube and camera) that allows the doctor to look directly inside the esophagus, stomach, and upper part of the small intestine. The esophagus is the tube like structure that connects the mouth to the stomach. At the point where the esophagus joins the stomach, the esophagus is kept closed by a specialized muscle called the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). This muscle is important because the pressure of the stomach is normally higher than that in the esophagus. The muscle of the LES relaxes after swallowing to allow passage of food into the stomach, but then it quickly closes again.

It normally stops by the time a baby is a year old, when the ring of muscle at the bottom of their oesophagus fully develops and stops stomach contents leaking out. Hydrolyzed protein formulas are made from cow’s milk with ingredients that are easily broken down for better digestion. These formulas are the most effective in reducing acid reflux, so they’re often recommended for infants with food allergies. Your doctor may want you to try this type of formula for a couple of weeks if food allergies are suspected. These formulas are more expensive than regular formulas.

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