Symptoms, Causes And Treatments

When these symptoms happen often or aren’t tied to certain ingredients, they might be due to gastroesophageal reflux (GER), also called reflux. In rare cases, when medical treatment alone doesn’t help and a child is failing to grow or develops other complications, a surgical procedure called fundoplication might be an option. This involves creating a valve at the top of the stomach by wrapping a portion of the stomach around the esophagus. If these don’t help and your child still has severe symptoms, then surgery might be an option. A pediatric gastroenterologist, a doctor who treats children who have digestive diseases, would do the surgery. Upper endoscopy. In this test, doctors directly look at the esophagus, stomach, and a portion of the small intestines using a tiny fiber-optic camera. During the procedure, doctors also may biopsy (take a small sample of) the lining of the esophagus to rule out other problems and see whether GER is causing other complications.

Keep your child away from cigarette smoke. Do not smoke or allow others to smoke around your child. If your adolescent smokes, encourage him or her to stop. Smoking weakens the lower esophageal sphincter and increases the risk of GERD. Ask your child’s healthcare provider for information if your adolescent currently smokes and needs help to quit. E-cigarettes or smokeless click this site tobacco still contain nicotine. Have your adolescent talk to his or her healthcare provider before using these products. Long-term bathing of the esophageal lining with stomach acid can lead to the precancerous condition Barrett’s esophagus. It can even lead to cancer of the esophagus if the disease isn’t effectively controlled, though this is rare in children.

Options for treatment include lifestyle and dietary modifications (see below), medications, and rarely surgery. Medications that can be prescribed include antacids, ulcer medications, proton pump inhibitors, and foam barrier medications. To be effective, these medications are usually prescribed for at least one month, and may be tapered off later after symptoms are controlled. For some patients, it can take two to three months of taking medication(s) to see effects. Upper GI x-rays are done to take pictures of your child’s stomach and intestines (bowel). Your child may be given a chalky liquid to drink before the pictures are taken. This liquid helps his or her stomach and intestines show up better on the x-rays.

Does your child complain of pain and uneasiness after eating? If your child doesn’t like to eat, complains of pain afterwards, is a highly fussy eater and has a persistent sore throat or cough, chances are that he or she suffers from acid reflux. Upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and biopsy, which uses an endoscope, a long, flexible tube with a light and camera at the end of it. The doctor runs the endoscope down your child’s esophagus, stomach, and first part of the small intestine. While looking at the pictures from the endoscope, the doctor may also take tissue samples ( biopsy ).

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