Types And Results

Indigestion, also called heartburn or acid reflux, is common in pregnancy. There’s still some controversy in the medical community over which foods actually cause reflux symptoms. Despite this lack of consensus, many researchers agree that certain types of foods and beverages are best avoided to prevent indigestion, heartburn, and other symptoms of acid reflux. Weight loss may also be helpful in reducing symptoms. During normal digestion, food travels down the esophagus (the tube between your mouth and stomach), through a muscular valve called the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), and into the stomach. The LES is part of the doorway between your esophagus and your stomach. It opens to allow food through and closes to stop stomach acids from coming back up.

For people who experience heartburn or indigestion infrequently, perhaps in association with occasional food and drink triggers, OTC treatments to reduce the acidity of the stomach contents are available. Complications of acid reflux can include any of the following. Most of these are rare, but GERD can be the first step toward any of them. The best treatment for any of these is prevention. The most frequently suggested changes include eating smaller meal portions which will decrease the amount of food in the stomach. By eating smaller, more frequent meals, you may be able to reduce reflux symptoms while still maintaining a healthy weight.

If your test results are positive and you’ve been planning to have a baby, take another test (or two) to make sure you’re pregnant. Then, see your doctor before you reach the 8-week mark. You can ask them about prenatal care options or specialists who can help guide you through your pregnancy. Ask your doctor a cool way to improve about any changes you need to make to your lifestyle, medications, or diet to keep yourself and your baby healthy for the next nine months. Keep the head of your bed higher than the foot of your bed. Or place pillows under your shoulders to help prevent stomach acids from rising into your esophagus.

Let your doctor what you are doing about your reflux disease and how well it is working. Acid reflux usually produces heartburn, whether it is due to a single episode of overeating or persistent GERD. GERD has been linked to a variety of respiratory and laryngeal complaints such as laryngitis , chronic cough , pulmonary fibrosis , earache , and asthma , even when not clinically apparent. These atypical manifestations of GERD are commonly referred to as laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) or as extraesophageal reflux disease (EERD).

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