What To Drink For Acid Reflux?

Heartburn is very common – and very unpleasant. Obesity is one of the main drivers behind both acid reflux and GERD. It may also increase the risk of GERD complications like Barrett’s esophagus, a condition involving precancerous changes in esophageal cells. In addition to following the guidelines discussed above, try sipping liquids instead of drinking them quickly to help prevent acid reflux symptoms. Keeping a food diary to help track what aggravates your symptoms can help you prevent symptoms throughout your pregnancy. The same basic strategies to ease reflux can help scleroderma patients as well: Avoid trigger foods and alcohol, don’t lie down after eating, eat smaller meals, and lose weight if you need to. Over-the-counter antacids may also help, but talk to your doctor before using them.

The way that a person drinks beverages can also worsen acid reflux or heartburn. Lean meats, such as chicken, turkey, fish, and seafood, are low-fat and reduce symptoms of acid reflux. Try them grilled, broiled, baked, or poached. Morning coffee is a daily habit for many, but people with acid reflux should avoid it when possible. Coffee can stimulate excess gastric acid secretions that may rise up to your esophagus, particularly when you drink a lot of it. This results in heightened acid reflux symptoms. Caffeine relaxes the LES or Lower Esophageal Sphincter, allowing stomach acid to travel back up the esophagus. Both coffee and tea contain caffeine, along with some sodas, which is why they are best avoided. Coffee also stimulates gastrin release and gastric acid secretion. In fact, research has found that decaffeinated coffee is safer for acid reflux sufferers.

Many people complain that they get reflux after eating certain foods. Common culprits include items high in fat, chocolate, spicy foods, citrusy or acidic foods like oranges and tomatoes, mint, garlic, and onions, as well as carbonated drinks. Dairy products. Not every person has a negative reaction to dairy foods, like yogurt or cheese, but some do. Milk products contain calcium, sugar and usually fat which can all trigger the release of more acid from the stomach. Acid reflux, though uncomfortable, is highly treatable.

Now that we have discussed what is safe to drink when you have acid reflux, let’s take a quick look at some of the drinks that are best avoided if you have acid reflux. The book’s staple foods offer plenty of variety and are geared toward reducing acid reflux. Carbonated beverages you can try these out are pumped with air (or bubbles) which expand the stomach upon ingestion. This exerts extra stress on the lower esophageal sphincter, triggering acid reflux. If you want something cold to sip on, choose flavored water or cold-pressed juices made from non-citrus fruits instead.

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